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Posts Tagged ‘maps’

Growing Blue

June 9, 2011 Leave a comment

Growing Blue is a website produced by Veolia Water (creator), Global Water Intelligence (co-manager) and Clean Water America Alliance (advisor) in consultation with many stakeholders and experts in the water industry. In their own words, Growing Blue is meant to  “serve as a resource for credible, accurate information on water. It is also aimed at increasing global awareness of our water challenges and the need for thoughtful solutions.”

It has interactive mapping called the “Blue Tool” that shows water usage by country in intuitive colours. You can also view other maps showing the municipal use, agricultural use or industrial use. By clicking on a specific country, you can access specific information regarding that country and where it ranks amongst 180 others. A screen capture below shows the tool for municipal water use in Canada, which ranks 9th (behind China, the U.S and India who hold the 1st to 3rd places respectively).

Blue Tool

Other features of this website include scenarios for 2030 and 2050, white papers and a list with links to studies (eg: EPA – Sustaining Our Nation’s Water Infrastructure) and water leaders such as WEF, Water for People and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).

It’s a useful site for the water and wastewater industry. Check it out.

Worldmapper Maps

May 18, 2011 Leave a comment

Have you ever wondered about which countries used the most domestic water? Or industrial water?  Or maybe you’re in the wastewater end of the industry and wanted to know which countries produced the least sewage sludge?

If you are interested for your own sake or wish to find an efficiently mapped diagram illustrating these types of values for your next presentation, try Worldmapper.

Worldmapper contains almost 700 maps illustrating world rates on resources, manufacturing, income, violence (and a surprisingly large number of maps on death…). I found at least a dozen on water or sewage.

The map below provides an example of their world map for Water Use (map #104). You can also obtain a pdf poster version. The different colours are used to identify geographical territories (and are consistent for all maps to facilitate comparisons) while the size represents the quantities of water usage for each territory. The pdf version also includes a smaller image of the land area map for reference.

For partners in fuel producing industries, there are maps for you (#109-120). There are also maps on gas, coal and crude petroleum imports/exports, if you’re into that kind of thing. It’s definitely worth having a look.

And did I mention it’s free?

NOTE: Image is copyright SASI Group (University of Sheffield) and Mark Newman (University of Michigan).